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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Essentials eBook now available in PDF and ePub formats for only $9.99
RHEL 6 Essentials contains 40 chapters and over 250 pages.

1.2. A Three-Tier Load Balancer Add-On Configuration

Figure 1.2, “A Three-Tier Load Balancer Add-On Configuration” shows a typical three-tier Load Balancer Add-On topology. In this example, the active LVS router routes the requests from the Internet to the pool of real servers. Each of the real servers then accesses a shared data source over the network.
A Three-Tier Load Balancer Add-On Configuration
A Three-Tier Load Balancer Add-On Configuration
Figure 1.2. A Three-Tier Load Balancer Add-On Configuration

This configuration is ideal for busy FTP servers, where accessible data is stored on a central, highly available server and accessed by each real server via an exported NFS directory or Samba share. This topology is also recommended for websites that access a central, highly available database for transactions. Additionally, using an active-active configuration with Red Hat Cluster Manager, administrators can configure one high-availability cluster to serve both of these roles simultaneously.
The third tier in the above example does not have to use Red Hat Cluster Manager, but failing to use a highly available solution would introduce a critical single point of failure.

 
 
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