Follow Techotopia on Twitter

On-line Guides
All Guides
eBook Store
iOS / Android
Linux for Beginners
Office Productivity
Linux Installation
Linux Security
Linux Utilities
Linux Virtualization
Linux Kernel
System/Network Admin
Programming
Scripting Languages
Development Tools
Web Development
GUI Toolkits/Desktop
Databases
Mail Systems
openSolaris
Eclipse Documentation
Techotopia.com
Virtuatopia.com

How To Guides
Virtualization
General System Admin
Linux Security
Linux Filesystems
Web Servers
Graphics & Desktop
PC Hardware
Windows
Problem Solutions

  




 

 

Android Development
Previous Page Home Next Page

User IDs and File Access

Each Android package (.apk) file installed on the device is given its own unique Linux user ID, creating a sandbox for it and preventing it from touching other applications (or other applications from touching it). This user ID is assigned to it when the application is installed on the device, and remains constant for the duration of its life on that device.

Because security enforcement happens at the process level, the code of any two packages can not normally run in the same process, since they need to run as different Linux users. You can use the sharedUserId attribute in the AndroidManifest.xml's manifest tag of each package to have them assigned the same user ID. By doing this, for purposes of security the two packages are then treated as being the same application, with the same user ID and file permissions. Note that in order to retain security, only two applications signed with the same signature (and requesting the same sharedUserId) will be given the same user ID.

Any data stored by an application will be assigned that application's user ID, and not normally accessible to other packages. When creating a new file with getSharedPreferences(String, int), openFileOutput(String, int), or openOrCreateDatabase(String, int, SQLiteDatabase.CursorFactory), you can use the MODE_WORLD_READABLE and/or MODE_WORLD_WRITEABLE flags to allow any other package to read/write the file. When setting these flags, the file is still owned by your application, but its global read and/or write permissions have been set appropriately so any other application can see it.

Android Development
Previous Page Home Next Page

 
 
  Published under the terms fo the Apache 2.0 License Design by Interspire